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Small business owners are looking for a few more qualified good men and women.

This is the 50th celebration of National Small Business Week, and the issues the typical small business owner has in making it all work have been well documented. One issue that covers the job market was brought up by researchers from personnel firm Robert Half International, who asked 330 small businesses what kind of hiring issues they were facing, At the top of the list was a shortage of qualified applicants. About 60 percent said that was the major issue. Also, 19 percent said it was difficult to maintain productivity and staff morale at the same time. 
{JOBS: Small businesses seek qualified applicants JUNE 17, 2013 BY JACK KATZANEK }

Bureau of Labor Statistics

For release 10:00 a.m. (EDT) Tuesday, April 9, 2013 USDL-13-0625 

Technical information: (202) 691-5870 • JoltsInfo@bls.gov • www.bls.gov/jlt Media contact (202) 691-5902 • PressOffice@bls.gov JOB OPENINGS AND LABOR TURNOVER – FEBRUARY 2013 

There were 3.9 million job openings on the last business day of February, up from 3.6 million in January, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. The hires rate (3.3 percent) and separations rate (3.1 percent) were little changed in February. This release includes estimates of the number and rate of job openings, hires, and separations for the non-farm sector by industry and by geographic region. Job Openings The number of job openings in February was 3.9 million, up from January. (See table 1.) This was the highest number of job openings since May 2008.

Year Period
Labor Force
Employment
Unemployment
Unemployment Rate
2012 Nov
18,537,332(B)
16,703,160(B)
1,834,172(B)
9.9(B)
2012 Dec
18,558,201(B)
16,745,114(B)
1,813,087(B)
9.8(B)
2013 Jan
18,594,466
16,776,554
1,817,912
9.8
2013 Feb
18,643,797
16,849,897
1,793,900
9.6
2013 Mar
18,628,900(P)
16,880,381(P)
1,748,519(P)
9.4(P)

There are a variety of ways to explain why the unemployment rate sits at 7.9 percent, but jobs are staying unfilled. Many companies argue that they would love to hire more workers, but the applicants they’ve seen don’t have the skills required for their openings. Tech companies like Microsoft say the problem of an unskilled U.S. workforce is so severe that the U.S. should allow more highly-skilled immigrants into the country to fill openings in science and technology. Still, U.S. companies could probably do more to ensure they get the types of workers they need. A July survey from the ManPower Group cited , “Bloomberg” found that American businesses were way less likely to train workers to fill job openings than their international counterparts.